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Writing For More Sales, More Traffic and Becoming A Trustworthy Resource In Your Market

trust writingSo, you want to a ton of traffic and sales from your website, right?  Of course you do!

But, sometimes we all have a tendency to get caught up in writing for the search engines instead of writing for the people that are reading the stuff.

Today’s post is going to be all about how you can…

-Make your post stand out in a sea of online garbage.

-Get people to interact with you on your website.

-Make more sales from your website.

-Get more free traffic.

-Get free backlinks and click-thrus with no extra work.

In today’s Internet we have a flood of poorly written material crowding the search engines.  With the recent update Google made with "Penguin" I noticed it pushed a lot more junk to the top.  Is it temporary?  Who knows.  But, some of this junk is so incoherent that it makes you wonder what the person who posted it was thinking.

However, inside that sea of Internet writing junk there are posts that pop out and make us say; “My oh my that was a good read!”  In return we Google plus the post, like it on Facebook, email it to our friends and tweet & re-tweet great information and share it in many other social ways.

In today’s search engine world we need as many social signals as we can get as well as regular backlinks.  Sure you can just get your stuff ranked in the top of the search engines and that’s fine but why not make something that is going to convert passerby’s into regular visitors, regular visitors into commenters and regular commenters into lifelong buyers?

It All Starts With Your Contenttrust within online community

It’s critical that when you put up a post you…

A). Know what you’re talking about.

B). Have done enough research to know that it will help people.

C). Makes sense for your market.

D). adequately covers the subject and leaves out as little as possible.

How To Know What You’re Talking About When Writing

The first thing you need to do is a little bit of research.  If you’re in a niche market that you’re absolutely new in, that’s O.K. but research your topic enough to know it will help your reader.

The easiest way to write out a nice little Q & A before you start writing.  Your Q & A can be laid out as follows:

Q1: What will my reader get from reading this?

Q2: If I was looking for this information would this article or post help me?

Q3: What would make this post or article GREAT instead of “same old same old?”

Q4: What do I personally want to achieve from writing this? 

Before you start writing simply go through and answer the above questions.  Everything you write should have a clear purpose for your reader as posed in question 1.

Let’s look at some possible things people can get from reading your article. 

It could be anything and you’ll know what your niche wants more that I will.  But, typically people are looking for ideas, help, and instructions or to be entertained.  So if you’re writing on “how to remove eye wrinkles” your reader is likely looking for how to remove eye wrinkles.  But, they might also be looking for an inexpensive way to do that as well.  If you provide directions to remove eye wrinkles and then show them a cheap way to do that wouldn’t that increase the probability that they will buy from you?

On Q2 I want you to think about how this information would help you if you were the one looking for it?  Are you answering their questions?  Are you teaching them something?  Are you completing the entire thought?

I want to touch on my last point of “Are you completing the entire thought?”

I found an article today that started out great but ended up irritating me more than anything.  This particular article was about preventing dandruff in cats by changing their diet.  My youngest cat has dandruff right now so I found this particular article on the Internet and started reading it.

The article pointed out that you need to make sure that your cats aren’t only eating dry food among many other things.

The article opening was great and it pointed out expert sources but where it completely failed and where they would have been able to sell me something was in the close of the article.  Do you know what killed the article for me?

They didn’t mention what food would solve this problem or what I need to look for in a cat food SPECIFICALLY.

The part that should have included specifics about what should be in the food simply said “Make sure the ingredients in your cats food has the right amount of protein, carbs and nutrients.” 

My immediate thought was; “Did I miss the part where they tell me what those actual numbers should be?”  Sadly, they never mentioned those numbers nor do they tell me a brand or send me to a link where I could buy the product that contains the right ingredients.

The article was merely written for the search engines and it ended up not helping me much.  Sure, the article had some good pointers that I will follow but I still don’t know what my cat needs to eat. 

Poor “Chomba” will continue suffering with dandruff for now.

Do you see my point though?  If they just would have told me exactly what I needed I probably would have ordered through them because the rest of the article seemed trustworthy.

So I shared all of that to simply say, make sure your article not only gives your reader the information they are looking for but tell the reader what they need to do or what will help them achieve their objective.  If you can at least do that you’ll have a good chance that they will buy from you.

Let’s look at Q3 now.

What Would Make My Article GREAT Instead Of Just O.K.?

An easy way to do this is go look at what other people are writing in your industry and write your content better.  But, there is more than just writing it better.  Maybe your competition isn’t adding screen shots, the best content writingimages, videos, step-by-step walk-throughs or maybe the writing in your industry is generally poor?

Whatever they are NOT doing, you should be.  In some of my industries people aren’t sharing enough video and walkthroughs or leaving a ton of actual and factual information out.  So I make it a point to add those types of media improvements whenever I can.  Hey, I’m not perfect, none of us are and we’ll all miss some opportunities but the more you focus on it the less likely it will occur.

Is providing this kind of content more work? 

Yep, it sure is.  But, you’ll have a piece of writing and media that can’t be rivaled, that stands out above the crowd and that will get shared by people.

Finally, What Do You Personally Hope To Achieve From Writing This?

What you hope to achieve might be different from someone else.  However, we should never be putting out content we don’t expect people to see, share or complete some type of action.

Do you just want more visitors?  Do you want more sales?  Do you want more public recognition?  Do you want to show that you’re an expert in your field?  No matter what it is, show it off!

A Few More Important Notes

Now and in the future the search engines aren’t just looking for 100% perfectly optimized material.  It’s true that keywords will help the search engines find you and optimized content is important for those purposes.  But, good high quality content helps people trust you, come back to you and buy from you.

I sometimes put up posts (like this one) that aren’t really targeted to the search engines.  But, they help my readers do something; learn something from my experiences so that they can grow their businesses.  You can do this for your readers as well and you’ll likely start seeing improved benefits directly from this.

Should You Do Keyword Research?

Yes!  Don’t stop doing that.  But, rather than just throwing up a 300 word perfectly optimized piece of content on your site focus more on making sure it’s achieving the 4 questions I challenged you to ask yourself about what your contents objective is or not just you, but your reader.  It’s O.K. to sometimes put up a smaller piece of writing and not everything you put up needs to be 1000 words long.  I always say as long as you’re covering the topic and it makes sense to your reader you shouldn’t worry about the length.

Ultimately, by doing this you’ll improve the sociability of your website, the returning visitors to your website and I am willing to bet, sales.

Tell me your thoughts?  What are you doing to achieve a higher returning readership or improve sales?

Also if you have any advice about helping my cat’s dandruff you can put that in the comments below as well ;)

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About Michael Brown

I'm Michael S. Brown, Internet Marketer, husband and father. I have been successful in business and marketing since 1998. In 2007 I took to the internet marketing world and have never looked back.

I love teaching people the knowledge that I have acquired and the ultimate boost to my ego is to see everyone I teach succeed in business. My goal is to make everyone who comes into contact with me as successful or even more successful than myself.

Comments

  1. Great article. Its really easy to get caught short by shifting all your focus to optimization. I have been caught out a few times which is strange because when I did my university degree it was a "101" factor when writing essays or papers to answer the question posed and stay on subject. I am very aware when paying writers for articles that you have to check this consistently. However, to save time and to be sure that everything is correct, I usually just re-edit these things myself for peace of mind. Cats really get dandruff? I always thought that was a "tongue-in-cheek" example…

  2. Great article Michael! Most of my articles are over 500 words now. Sometimes I find it difficult but I like the little Q & A you suggest. Will use that and see how that helps.

  3. Michael, I know you already know this – but, totally agree. And this carries into your own info products too.
    I see a lot of garbage, or at least mediocre, info products being sold online. And all it takes is a little extra care to make a better product – a product that others will talk about, recommend, etc. If you're just being mediocre, why would anyone get excited about your product (Kind of like letting me drive your East German Trabi, when I thought I'd be getting behind the wheel of a sportscar).
    First, do a bit of research. The Internet is there for a reason. Use it. It's the most powerful research tool on the planet. Find those tidbits and facts that make your product better. For example: In my guide to creating affiliate promo videos for YouTube, it only took a little research to get the compelling facts I put in my introduction.
    Next, use pictures. Repeat, USE PICTURES. Screenshots for digital stuff – photos for physical stuff. I have lost count of the crappy guides I've seen, where the writer expected me to wade through long paragraphs of description, when an image would have showed me how. For how-to guides, how-to images make for happy customers – and the bonus is, less writing for you.
    So, please, polish up your info products. Don't settle for mediocre.

  4. Very good article Michael.  I too believe that all it takes is just a little bit more to go from just OK to Great.
    That's just my $0.025,
    John
     

  5. michaelbrown says:

    Brent,

    Yea, cats unfortunately can :)   That's also good you read and edit all of your articles you get from outsourcing instead of just accepting anything they send.  I have to admit in some niche markets I am in I have sometimes just went with whatever they wrote in the past.  I watched my sales increase when I modified their writings to match my own.

  6. michaelbrown says:

    Kathy,

    Sometimes getting those posts over 500 words i tough.  On thing I've found is if you mainly focus on making sure the piece is helpful and great and covers all of those 4 questions it's MUCH easier to have 500 or more words of content each time.

  7. michaelbrown says:

    Kevin,

    Awesome comments!  You know, when I was writing this the other day you're one of the people I thought about.  You do many unique things on your sales pages and other writing I've seen of yours as well.

    All of those things you do stand out in the crowd.  Thanks for sharing that :)

  8. michaelbrown says:

    Thanks John.  Glad to see you make it out here today.

  9. Hi Michael,
    Great post! I've always written my articles with 3 – 4 specific questions in mind, then done my KW research. It also doesn't hurt to look at other articles on your subject to determine what could possibly make them boring to your readers. Inject a good dose of personality into your writing — I've learned to stay away from formality unless I'm writing a highly technical piece. You don't want to put people to sleep :)

  10. Great article Michael!  One trick that I use is to use Google to find out what questions people are asking about a particular product.  Using your example, one could google "best cat shampoo for . ."   Let Google show you what words follow that phrase in the questions that are being searched for.  I then use those questions as subtitles in my article.  It really works – both from a content generation and a SEO standpoint.
    Jim

  11. michaelbrown says:

    Sherry,

    I love these 2 points…

    It also doesn't hurt to look at other articles on your subject to determine what could possibly make them boring to your readers

    Inject a good dose of personality into your writing

    Your second point about personality is huge.  When I think of what I like to read I always like a bit of that person to come through their writing.  Thanks for sharing this.

     

  12. michaelbrown says:

    Jim,

     

    Great ideas.. Thank you for sharing these.  2 birds with one stone with that technique.  :)

  13. Hi Michael,
    Just wanted you to know how much I enjoyed your ariticle above, especially since I'm currently in the middle of writing/submitting articles so they can be linked back to my site. 
    If you still need a tip regarding cat food, try Science Diet.  All my guys are on it…cats and dog.  People are always commenting on the softness of their fur, and when the vet rubs back their hair to see if their skin is dry, there's never a problem.  Wouldn't be surprised if science diet has a particular type of food specific to dryness, and dandruff.  I feed my guys moist food, with a bit of dry on the side.  Science Diet can be found in Petco, Pet Supplies Plus,  etc., and online too.  Good luck!  Hope this helps!
    Mary
     
     

  14. michaelbrown says:

    Mary,

    Thanks for the cat food tips!  I'll check into it :)

  15. Thanks for the article Michael.
    I particularly liked the story about your cat. You flesh out Q2 by giving an effective simple case study as an example. I don't know about others but I find case studies excellent for teaching and I wish others used them more often.
    Couldn't your case study also be looked at as an example for an market opportunity? You went looking for a solution to a problem and couldn't find one. Perhaps others are also disappointed. So you begin to research the cat dandruff market.

  16. michaelbrown says:

    Grant,

    Great point :) It can certainly be used for that and that is a fantastic way to get started in a niche.

  17. Michah Hadley says:

    @ Mary Davidson……..sorry, a bit off topic, but I also swear by Science Diet for my chihuahua. It is the best dry food by far…and it's omega 3 and  essential fatty acids (fish mainly) that you might want to increase in your cat's diet Michael. This improves elasticity and natural moisture (sebum) in the skin…. :) (glad to see that my history in Pathology is still being put to good use!)
    Thanks for this great article and the comments are great. Learning something new every day. Thanks everyone for wise words.
    Michah
     
     

  18. Excellent points for writing. Nothing more needs said on that.

    About Chomba… I had a cat a while back that was bad with dandruff. However, after taking her to the vets when we found her squelching in pain in the middle of the night, it turned out the skin condition was a side effect of urinary crystals. Poor wee toty went to the litter tray and started squealing in pain.

    Taxi in the middle of the night, off to the vets, a few tests done and she was put on hills pet food.

    Can’t recall the exact name, but it wasn’t dry. It was canned and it was darn expensive from the vets. Turned out the change in pet food sorted the crystal issue, and the dandruff.

    In the UK the food was about £2.00 a can, sold in batches of 24. That’s about 3.24 USD (x 24 cans) for those across the pond, and it was a half can size for one feed only.(around £96 one month, and £48 the second cos of the batch size) From the vets that is. I looked at the tin to see who manufactured it, and it was Hills. Web address on the can, so contacted them and got direct shipment from manufacturers. Half the price and free shipment.

    Nothing worse than seeing your pet in pain, worrying if you can afford another 48 tins at the end of the month, or see the poor cat suffer.

    Because it was prescription food, they did inquire about the purposes, took the vet clinics details and what have you, but within the week, we had our supplies. Just left us with a ticked off vet cos they’re profit margins were diminished. lol. Trying to tell me he hadn’t a clue Hills offered at that price. Chancers.

    Needless to say, the insurance didn’t cover it because it had previously been diagnosed with kidney problems. Pre-existing illness clause. ****ers

    Anyway, you can get others to pay for it by doing as you say. Write the content with a purpose, tell others and refer them to pet food direct, where hills prescription diet food is sold and they’ve an affiliate program, helping folk keep the vet bill down.

    Got it sorted anyway. Hope Chomba’s sorted too.

    BTW…after all that to get wee toty’s condition cleared up, she ran off on us. Loyalty eh! Had her for 14 years so I guess it was that time. ;(

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